Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Let this be a lesson to all you! Ideas are very dangerous things! You are mindless, soil-shoving losers, put on this Earth to serve us!

PK NOTE: SBPDL still needs your help. I really want to do a podcast a couple of times a week (you'll be shocked to know the type of guests I'll get to come on). I really want to do YouTube videos. But to make it happen, we need your help.  This site gets anywhere from 5,000 - 6,500 repeat visitors a day (on top of unique visitors), and with just $2.00 from each, we'd be ready to rock with the YouTube videos and the Podcast. Trust, it's an investment in something very tangible.  You can make a donation via the PayPal link in right-hand side of the site, or you can make a tax-deductible donation to the Paul Kersey Fund at VDare.com


Before we get back to your regularly scheduled SBPDL programming, let's look at a quick scene from A Bug's Life. The 2nd best movie Pixar has produced (The Incredibles being a runaway favorite), the following scene is important to remember as we prepare to hear Hillary Clinton denounce the Alt-Right on Thursday
"We're a lot stronger than you say we are... And you know it, don't you?"


We all know the fable of the Grasshopper and the Ant, right? Well, here's the pivotal scene from A Bug's Life when the ant (Flik) figures out the emperor is wearing no clothes. The grasshopper (Hopper) is lecturing the ant on the natural order of things - which is, obviously, unnatural
Hopper: Let this be a lesson to all you ants! Ideas are very dangerous things! You are mindless, soil-shoving losers, put on this Earth to serve us!  
Flik: You're wrong, Hopper. Ants are not meant to serve grasshoppers. I've seen these ants do great things, and year after year they somehow manage to pick food for themselves *and* you. So-so who is the weaker species? Ants don't serve grasshoppers! It's *you* who need *us*! We're a lot stronger than you say we are... And you know it, don't you?
Somewhere in this powerful scene is a metaphor for our time. I'm just not quite sure people understand the enormity of what is being unleashed across the western world.


 

Monday, August 22, 2016

SBPDL Still Needs Your Help



PK NOTE: SBPDL still needs your help. I really want to do a podcast a couple of times a week (you'll be shocked to know the type of guests I'll get to come on). I really want to do YouTube videos. But to make it happen, we need your help.  This site gets anywhere from 5,000 - 6,500 repeat visitors a day (on top of unique visitors), and with just $2.00 from each, we'd be ready to rock with the YouTube videos and the Podcast. Trust, it's an investment in something very tangible.  You can make a donation via the PayPal link in right-hand side of the site, or you can make a tax-deductible donation to the Paul Kersey Fund at VDare.com

So one more day of the capital raise, and then we're back with your regularly scheduled SBPDL. 

We need your help. Thanks to all those who have donated! But it's time to jumpstart the Summer 2016 fundraiser.

So let's roll the dice.

  • You can make a donation via the PayPal button on the right-hand side column of this site, with a $25.00 ensuring a signed copy of the Paul Kersey book of your choice. 
  • Know that a donation of $50 will also get you a signed copy of the soon-to-be-released After the Marching Stops: The Reality of Selma, Alabama. 
  • A donation of $225 will get you all books authored by Paul Kersey, signed (12 books!!)!
  • But also know this: if we can raise $5,000 or more, I'll start doing a podcast (four a week) with very special guests. You'd be surprised who I could get to come on air. 
Thanks so much!

Saturday, August 20, 2016

SBPDL Needs Your Help

PK NOTE: SBPDL needs your help. You can make a donation via the PayPal link in right-hand side of the site, or you can make a tax-deductible donation to the Paul Kersey Fund at VDare.com)

We need your help. Thanks to all those who have donated! But it's time to jumpstart the Summer 2016 fundraiser.

So let's roll the dice.

  • You can make a donation via the PayPal button on the right-hand side column of this site, with a $25.00 ensuring a signed copy of the Paul Kersey book of your choice. 
  • Know that a donation of $50 will also get you a signed copy of the soon-to-be-released After the Marching Stops: The Reality of Selma, Alabama. 
  • A donation of $225 will get you all books authored by Paul Kersey, signed (12 books!!)!
  • But also know this: if we can raise $5,000 or more, I'll start doing a podcast (four a week) with very special guests. You'd be surprised who I could get to come on air. 
Thanks so much!

Friday, August 19, 2016

His Name is Gene Emory Dacus: White Veteran Survived Korean War, Couldn't Survive 75 percent Black Birmingham, Alabama

PK NOTE: Thanks to all those who have donated. You want the podcast or videos? SBPDL needs your help. You can make a donation via PayPal link in right-hand side of the site, or you can make a tax-deductible donation to the Paul Kersey Fund at VDare.com)


My veins flow with the blood of a Birmingham, Alabama that no longer exists. You'll know this you've read The Tragic City: Birmingham 1963-2013.
Another white person, this time an 85-year-old Korean War veteran, is set on fire by a black person. This time, in 75 percent black Birmingham, Alabama


One of my favorite memories is hearing my grandparents tell me stories of what a majority white, white-ruled Birmingham was like when they grew up as a child my age. To hear stories of the beautiful marble interior of the Birmingham Terminal Station and how white children could peacefully jump on street cars and traverse the city never made sense to me, because the Birmingham I knew was filled with dangerous black people, blighted buildings and boarded up homes, as well as virtually no white faces. 

In high school, I attended the last Iron Bowl at Legion Field, and we were forced to park in the fenced-in area of Birmingham Southern College, because of how dangerous the entirely black-area surrounding the stadium was for white fans attending the game (the fence was erected after a white co-ed was raped by a black male and murdered). 

Now a near 75 percent black dystopia, Birmingham is not a safe city for white people. It's almost less than 20 percent today, with a completely black dominated city council, black mayor, majority black police force and majority black public workforce. 

But for Birmingham, we wouldn't be living under the tyranny of Black-Run America (BRA), because the true hero of the 20th century - Bull Connor - dared stand to defend white civilization and their posterity from the very people who birthed an individual capable of burning alive an 85-year-old Korean War veteran.  ['Somebody burned up Mr. Gene' -- Community struggles with murder of beloved war veteran, Birmingham News, August 17, 2016]:

An 85-year-old Korean War veteran found burned to death in the back yard of his North Birmingham home spent his life taking care of others, friends and family said.
 
Gene Emory Dacus, known affectionately by his neighbors as "Mr. Gene," served his country in the U.S. Army, served his family by loving them, teaching them and taking care of them, and served his neighbors by cutting their grass, picking up trash and being their friend. "He was the most kindhearted gentleman you ever met,'' said Gary Dacus, one of the victim's three sons. " He never met a stranger, and he helped anybody he could." 
A teen suspect is in custody, and formal charges are expected on Thursday. 
Birmingham police were called to Dacus' home Wednesday morning around 12:30 a.m. after receiving calls about a person on fire. When they arrived on the scene, they found the elderly man burned in the back of his home. He was pronounced dead on the scene. 
Birmingham police spokesman Lt. Sean Edwards said witnesses told police they saw a fire in the yard before seeing a man running down a nearby alley with a red gasoline jug. Police arrested that man a short distance from the crime scene. 
Edwards said that the preliminary investigation shows the suspect and the victim had an argument, before the victim was doused with gasoline and set on fire. 
"This homicide shocks the conscience of any reasonable person. Our hearts are hurting for the victim, his family and our community,'' said Birmingham police Chief A.C. Roper. "The suspect actually confessed to this crime but we have not received any logical justification to explain what happened." 
Neighbor Helen McComb said she was at her nearby home late Tuesday night when she heard a commotion outside and went on her front porch to investigate. "I could see something burning,'' she said. "Then a guy ran out yelling somebody had burned up Mr. Gene." 
McComb said she ran to the crime scene and saw Dacus. "I lost it," she said. "He's been here forever. People here loved Mr. Gene." 
Friends and neighbors this afternoon were taking Dacus' death hard. Todd Ahmed said Dacus was one of the first people he met when he moved here from Sudan and said he is devastated by the slaying. 
"I have a lot of friends but none like him,'' Ahmed said. "I'm really shocked. He was nice, nice, nice. He always told me if I needed help to come to him." 
Even at 85, Dacus made it his priority to tidy the neighborhood. He cut his neighbors' grass, and they watched out for him. "He was very sweet to all of the children,'' McComb said. "He kept our neighborhood clean." 
Dacus' car was stolen about three weeks ago. Neighbors said he then became worried about his truck also getting stolen so they advised him to pull it into his yard and close to his house, which he did. 
That truck, however, disappeared about the same time he was killed. Police are now searching for his 1999 Dodge Ram pickup. It is white with a blue hood. 
Gary Dacus said his father was a Georgia native who was in the U.S. Army and served in the Korean War. After his discharge, Dacus became an airplane mechanic, first for Drummond Aircraft and then Lockheed Martin. He and his wife, Earnestine, together raised three sons. After all of his children got out school, Dacus and his wife moved to Birmingham to care for his grandparents in their family home – that was in the 1950s.
Eventually his grandparents died, but he and his wife and their disabled son, who is now 60, stayed in the 33rd Avenue North home. Earnestine Dacus died in 2005, but her grieving husband refused to move away. Gary Dacus said he worried about his aging father. "I did try to get him to move,'' he said. "I had a home set up for him and ready for him to move in but he wouldn't do it." 
He said his parents were born during the Depression, and lived a modest life. What they may have lacked in education or money, they more than made up for in love and compassion. "He taught me good rules and I have a lot of my father in me,'' he said. "I'm a successful person for that." 
Gary Dacus said he received the heartbreaking news about his father's death early today and immediately drove to Birmingham. "I got the call, and I just broke down,'' he said. 
He said the suspect hit his father in the head, left the scene and then returned and set him on fire to try to conceal the crime. "The only thing I can hope to God for is that he was dead before he was burned,'' the emotional son said. "You expect your parents to die before you, but to die a horrendous death like that is unimaginable." 
Gary Dacus is now making funeral arrangements for his father, who will be buried in Gardendale alongside his wife. The son is also making plans to take custody of his disabled brother. 
The suspect, Gary Dacus said, "should never be able to walk the face of the earth again." "My father's death is a tragic loss,'' he said. "The community lost one of its pillars."
Bull Connor tried to keep Birmingham safe for white people.

He failed.

Gene Emory Dacus lived in a Birmingham when white people were in charge of the city's destiny, only to have to it ripped from their hands by the forces of an extremely anti-white modernity.

One wonders, as he was attacked why the black male and lay dying, if in a moment of clarity - just before he was doused with gasoline/lighter fluid and set on fire - he realized just why Connor made his stand on behalf of white people living in the city then and those white people who would have to live in a future Birmingham?

We owe Bull Connor a big apology, for each day brings more damning evidence he was one of the true heroes of the 20th century. Gene Emory Dacus, who was burned alive in 75 percent black Birmingham in 2016, is proof of this fact.